Wild-Safari In India

1) Bandavgarh, Madhya Pradesh

Making a magnificent trip to Bandhavgarh will definitely take you to the lush greenery of the forested regions that are incredibly the natural abode of the variant of wild species. Catching the amazing glimpses of these majestic creatures are simply incredible and with safari opportunities in Bandhavgarh you can have it all in a complete organized way. With elephant and jeep safari you can have a closer look to all these majestic creatures including the royal tigers and making a safe and visible glare to these species will complete your jungle safari in a true sense.

2) Kanha, Madhya Pradesh

The lush sal and bamboo forests, grassy meadows and ravines of Kanha provided inspiration to Rudyard Kipling for his famous novel “Jungle Book”. The Kanha National Park in Madhya Pradesh came into being in 1955 and forms the core of the Kanha Tiger Reserve, created in 1974 under Project Tiger. The Park’s landmark achievement is the preservation of the rare hardground Swamp Deer (Barasingha), saving it from near extinction. Stringent conservation programs for the overall protection of the Park’s fauna and flora, makes Kanha one of the most well maintained National Parks in Asia. A heightened attraction within the Park is Bamni Dadar,  popularly known as Sunset Point that offers the most awe-inspiring backdrop of the sunset against grazing Sambhars and Gaurs, magnifying the natural splendor of the area.

3) Sunderbans, West Bengal

Sunderbans, the world’s largest estuarine forest and delta covered by mangrove forests and vast saline mud flats is situated on the lower end of Gangetic West Bengal.  A land of 54 tiny islands, criss-crossed by innumerable tributaries of the Ganges that was once infested by Arakanese and Portuguese pirates is now the abode of varied flora & fauna population. Sunderban is bound on the west by river Muriganga and on the east by rivers Harinbhahga and Raimangal. Other major rivers flowing through this eco-system are Saptamukhi, Thakurain Matla and Gosaba.

4) Pench, Madhya Pradesh

Pench Tiger Reserve comprises the Indira Priyadarshini Pench National Park, the Mowgli Pench Sanctuary and a buffer. The Park nestles in the Southern slopes of the Satpura ranges of Central India. The river Pench, which splits the National Park into two, forms the lifeline of the Park. The area of the present tiger reserve has a glorious history. A description of its natural wealth and richness occurs in Ain-i-Akbari. Several natural history books like R. A. Strendale’s ‘Seonee – Camp life in Satpura Hills,’ Forsyth’s ‘Highlands of Central India’ and Dunbar Brander’s ‘Wild Animals of Central India’ explicitly present the detailed panorama of nature’s abundance in this tract. Strendale’s semi-autobiographical ‘Seonee’ was the inspiration behind Rudyard Kipling’s The Jungle Book.

5) Corbett, Uttarakhand

Corbett has been a haunt for tourists and wildlife lovers for a long time. Tourism activity is only allowed in selected areas of Corbett Tiger Reserve so that people get an opportunity to see its splendid landscape and the diverse wildlife. In recent years the number of people coming here has increased dramatically. Presently, every season more than 70,000 visitors come to the park from India and other countries.

Corbett National Park comprises 520.8 km2 (201.1 sq mi) area of hills, riverine belts, marshy depressions, grasslands and a large lake. The elevation ranges from 1,300 to 4,000 ft (400 to 1,220 m). Winter nights are cold but the days are bright and sunny. It rains from July to September.

6) Sasan Gir Wildlife Sanctuary, Gujarat

Gir is one of India’s oldest sanctuaries, and is synonymous with the majestic Asiatic lion (Panthera leo persica). The only place in India to see this animal, this park can take legitimate pride in saving an endangered species, which was at the threshold of extinction in the start of the twenty-first century, by providing it a more secured habitat. The Gir ecosystem falls in Biogeography Zone-4 (the semi arid) and Biogeography Province 4-B. Gujarat Rajwara is the last remaining abode of the Asiatic Lion, Panthera leo persica. The Government of Gujarat has declared an area of 1412.1 sq km as Protected Area (PA) which comprises 258.7 sq km as National Park and 1153.4 sq km as Sanctuary. Besides this 470.5 sq km of forest area forms a buffer Zone as reserve, protected and unclassified forest. Thus, a total area of 1882.6 sq km makes up the Gir forest